Vogue – The ultimate foodie experience in Paris, all in one place

Le 6 avril 2017

In February, Four Seasons Hotel George V, Paris’s restaurants were awarded with the highly coveted stars—Le Cinq with three and newcomers L’Orangerie and Le George each with one—making it the first hotel in the country to ever have three Michelin-starred establishments

Vogue – The ultimate foodie experience in Paris, all in one place

Located just off the Champs-Élysées in an Art Deco building built in 1928 and home to the iconic terraced penthouse with a stunning view of the Eiffel Tower, Four Seasons Hotel George V is the definition of Parisian luxury and elegance. Upon arrival, you are greeted with a magnificent chandelier and inviting floral arrangements by Jeff Leatham in the lobby before you reach the marble courtyard flanked by the accolade-receiving eateries. Aesthetics aside, there is now even more reason than ever to stay at this prestigious hotel, particularly for the discerning gastronome. With some of the best of the best in the City of Light all housed under one roof, here’s how to have the ultimate foodie experience in Paris.

For the second year in a row, Le Cinq has been bestowed with Michelin’s highest distinction. Helmed by Christian Le Squer, formerly of Pavillon Ledoyen where he held a three-star ranking for 12 consecutive years, it would seem that the effervescent chef has the golden touch. Enter through wrought iron doors into a dining room where Neoclassic, Art Deco, and Louis XV and Louis XVI styling all come together with a touch of modernity in its gold, cream, and gray palette. The decor is most apropos here, foreshadowing the transcendent meal to come. Because while the menu is rooted in tradition and chef Le Squer’s technical acumen shines in every plate, there is a lightness (sweet, fresh green peas that are balanced nicely with a slightly sour lemon yogurt, a touch of bright mint, and a few tart red currants) and an occasional hint of international influence (a buttery turbot with a miso sauce, watercress puree, vinegar sauce, lemon, milk skin, and Japanese pear topped with a Sichuan peppercorn flake) in his dishes that are atypical of classic French haute cuisine. To top it all off, Le Cinq thankfully lacks the arrogance and stuffiness often associated with such restaurants. Yes, the white linen tablecloths are steamed before service; the china and silver all specifically commissioned; and domes are gracefully lifted off plates in unison, but the jovial live music from the neighboring La Galerie lounge that floats its way into the room paired with the chatter and laughter of its patrons are welcomed attributes that create a much more desirable and convivial ambiance than expected.